Three Secrets About Rescue Missions

Three Secrets About Rescue Missions

Unless you work or volunteer at a rescue mission, there may be a few secrets about them that you didn’t realize. Here are the top three secrets about rescue missions.

Amanda Luzzader
Amanda Luzzader
Content Writer
Three Secrets About Rescue Missions

Unless you work or volunteer at a rescue mission, there may be a few secrets about them that you didn't realize. Here are the top three secrets about rescue missions.

  1. Rescue missions aren't just for the homeless.

When you think of rescue missions, you might think they simply provide assistance for those experiencing homelessness or housing crises. While this is an important form of assistance that rescue missions provide, it's not the only one. Rescue missions also help with many other needs, such as temporary food assistance, trauma intervention, mental health services, and substance-abuse treatment.

  1. Rescue missions usually are not government funded. 

Some rescue missions receive grants or financial assistance from federal, state, or civic government organizations and agencies. However, most rely on generous donations from individuals and businesses.

  1. The backgrounds and demographics of rescue mission patrons vary widely.  

Those who utilize the services provided by rescue missions come from a variety of backgrounds and demographics. Ages range from young adults to the elderly, and the need for services affects all genders. A given rescue mission could be helping a family who has fallen on hard times, a veteran dealing with mental illness, and a young person struggling with drug addiction. Some rescue mission patrons are employed, have families, and may hold college degrees. And the reasons people seek help from rescue missions are just as varied. Rescue Missions are for all types of people.

Because rescue missions help a variety of people with a variety of needs, it can be important to establish lines of communication with them to understand their unique situations. A single mother of three visiting a rescue mission might have a completely different perspective on what services are a priority and what her greatest needs are compared to those of a single, elderly man. Providing lots of opportunities to provide feedback and to talk to patrons can help ensure the success of a rescue mission.